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how tot throw the discus and discus techniques

Discus Killer and Simple Concepts

This week I have schedule in the books a big project to share a lot of tips and insights. The inspiration came from what I saw this weekend at my Discus camp in So Cal…  and during virtually every throws camp I do.

Today, I will touch on a few topics, and dig in more as we approach the Thanksgiving Holiday.

This past Saturday, Arete Throws Nation completed its 3rd Preseason Throws camp: Discus… All Day!

We divided the groups by modest marks- above 130ft =  group 1 and 110ft or below= group 2.

Camps are a microcosm of the state of throwing and the efficiency of throws coaching that throwers are receiving.

It is categorized a little like this…

  1. A couple of solid coaches, decent skill levels.
  2. Multiple Coaches, with little correct throws coaching info.
  3. No coaching/No Coach.
  4. and sadly… Bad Coaching…. REALLY BAD!!!!

Bad throws coaching is typically the result of using incorrect concepts about the throw, having limited information on how to teach technique, and/or going all in with developing a program using incorrect info… (many times it’s just a lack of experience and a solid understanding of the Science of the Throw).

A poorly executed throws program really does damage to a thrower’s development, and sadly it happens all the time… but we’ll talk about that later on.

At our throws camps, we, of course, teach the TCR™ system (Throwing Chain Reaction™) to clarify the concept of the throw. We will drill the 6 Pillars in the 1st half and throw in the afternoon using the Pillar Connection phases. (I’ve included a quick Excerpt from our camp talking about this and the process)

—– to attend an ATN camp in Dec, Click Here

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I’ll spend 45 minutes on pillar 1 and explain “how” (rather than simply show) a progression should look, feel, and be coached.

We spend the time to drive home the importance of Pillar 1- Setting Up the Trigger Action…

which is how to set separation and the sprint leg axis.

We then spend a bunch of time drilling pillar 2: Setting up Maximum Power.

Pillars 1-2 & 6 are the most complete pillars.

In pillar 2, we start with the CM shift Drills-  keeping the Knees apart to maintain the separations that is set in pillar 1. This teaches the throwers the critical position of setting up Maximum Power.

Each year I am always surprised by how something simple is difficult to do and learn.

After about 45 minutes on how to properly set separation, I said to the campers, “This is what you have to do correctly if you want to throw far fast

 

… And it’s true!  It’s how we routinely see athletes improve 25+ feet in the discus and over 6-8 feet in the shot.  It’s also how they will be throwing farther in just a few weeks if they really work on Pillar 1 & 2.

If you get Pillar 1 and 2 close, the throw is MUCH better because the TCR™ system is much better.  Seriously, you can mess up pillars 3-6 and still manage decent throw, but if P1 & P2 are wrong… its OVER!….

… The throw is toast!

The point is,  both coaches and throwers need to understand that you need to spend the time to set the foundation.

In fact, most programs shouldn’t even begin throwing for at least 2 weeks.

They should do drills, like machines every day for 2 weeks, and started developing throwing strength.

I guarantee,  you will have the best season ever if you focus on learning and doing the right things first;  spend the time to master Pillar 1 & 2 during the first 4 weeks with a thrower.. ..

…Its makes a huge difference!

I also talked about how to simplify the throw.

You’re familiar with the expression “Don’t’ put the cart before the horse”….. well in throwing, “Don’t put the throw before the technique”.

Trust me, it happens all the time!

I strive to really make it clear how the Throwing Chain Reaction™ works. Its real. It powerful.

At each camp I see recurring mistakes….

… and at this camp last weekend, it was no different.

For new Throwers, one of the biggest mistakes in the discus is bringing the discus forward in the throw as they go through the throw, meaning the arm can’t stay back as they move from Pillar 1 to Pillar 3 .

There is a simple reason.

The don’t hold the discus properly.

They are grabbing and gripping the disc, and therefore, they are almost entirely focused on NOT dropping the Discus.

This crushes the throw because the feedback mechanism is totally jacked up…

… They must learn to hold the discus, and how to carry it properly in the throw.

From newbie to more advanced throwers, this is a more common issue than people realize!

Throwers that don’t hold the discus properly will do all drills and training incorrectly because they can sense the discus is going to come out, so they make all kinds of technical compensations, and as a result, and they will never really feel the timing of the hips and the timing of how the arm is supposed to feel.

This is the Pillar Killer, again because the Feedback Mechanism is crushed… which will be discussed later this week.

This issue prohibits the TCR™ system from flowing properly because Pillar 1 will be incorrect,breaking the “chain reaction”… get it?

…   holding the implement (in all throws) must be done correctly and first.

If you see the unwind, look at how kids carry the discus.

This is the juicy stuff a lot of people don’t talk about and it makes a major difference because once throwers establish the wrong pattern, it’s a total pain to arse to correct it.

And the this carry issue is more prevalent than most people realize!

Stay tuned for tomorrows email, where I go into more tips and revelations from last week’s Discus Camp.

-Coach Johnson

strength training programs for shot put and discus throwers

Strength Training Programs For Shot Put and Discus

To achieve success, as a throws coach, you need a carefully designed strength-training program that pairs seamlessly

with an equally solid, technique focused, throws program.

 

You’ve heard me talk about technique before, so today, I’m going to talk about strength

programs for shot put and discus throwers.

 

An Arete Nation secret weapon, that has contributed to our

consistent increases in athletic performance, is our focus on the function of the body…

 

…too many strength training programs out there are designed poorly,

and as a result, come up short on overall sports performance.

 

First, many programs assume that the athlete is 100% functional,

and second, they don’t take into account posture inefficiencies.

 

Rebalancing posture is a simple, but powerful process for addressing gross posture issues.

If a thrower’s body is out of alignment, it will create limits his ability to not only perform lifts

and other exercises correctly, but it also sets up limits of success in the ring.

 

Posture analysis and diagnosis is a core process in the ATN strength training system.

Addressing imbalances routinely takes very average kids and make them good throwers,

turns our good throwers into elites, and produces good collegiate throwers into top pros.

 

Posture rebalancing for shot putter and discus throwers is a key part to understanding

how to design the athlete’s program, how to plan the the training cycles, and it assists you to better

understand what will interfere with your athlete’s ability to move dynamically.

 

The challenge throw coaches face is choosing the right lifts

and strength exercises that produce better throwers.  

Don’t make the mistake of falling for the pure strength trap.

 

Throwers are athletes that need to develop dynamic strength.

Pure strength like power lifting does little to improve a thrower’s ability to throw far.

We get the allure of big numbers in the weight room, but the science of developing strength that translates

to big throws, requires a much more thorough understanding of the Annual Training Cycle and most

important how to set up a periodized program that has throwers throwing their best when it matter most.

 

It’s important to learn how to utilize the principles of block periodization to create the most effective annual

and in-season competition training cycle. It’s the job of the throws coach to create multiple peaking windows

rather than a single peak.

 

If you are looking for more information on how to design a strength training program for throwers

and how to design the 3 training blocks: Size, Strength & Competition Speed, and create the 3 peaks

in the track and field season: beginning, middle, and championship phase,

check out my Online Strength Training & Program Design program.

 

ATN Online Throws Coach Course:

Strength Training For Throwers

Click here for more info about the Strength Training & Program Design

 

Learn how to develop a more dynamic throws program, and how to establish training percentages

for each individual thrower based on their technical capability, strength levels,

and conditioning levels- today!